Sheaf can take his game to next level with Stevenage loan

Arsenal defender Ben Sheaf will spend the rest of the season on loan with League Two side Stevenage.

Having joined Arsenal from West Ham United as a defensive midfielder in 2014, Sheaf has made excellent progress and has been converted into a ball-playing centre-back.

Sheaf is highly regarded by Arsene Wenger and has made two appearances for the Arsenal first-team so far, featuring in the Europa League and the Carabao Cup.

The 19-year-old will hope to make a major impact at Stevenage before returning to Arsenal in the summer ready to impress in pre-season.

10 comments

  1. At this age I would expect from him to play Championship football or maybe join some Dutch side. Playing against semi professional players is no better than playing against other talents of his age in reserve team.

      1. Most of the players in League Two are from England. If you consider England as a second tier national team how can you consider League Two as fully professional?
        Would you consider players from Brasilian 4th division or French 4th division? (Brasil is actually top nation with one of the best talent pool, unlike England)
        I think this guy should aim for higher than mid table League Two team for his loan, he would easily get decent loan in Eredivisie

    1. That will depend on many things. I watched one Europa league qualification game (can’t remember the year but that game is just stuck in my memory) and on the one side there was “professional team” (like you say, full time bloody hard) and on the other, there was semi-pro team (guys just finished morning shifts in factories and went straight to the game). The professional team had one shot off target in 90 minutes, and the way they played, you could hardly tell who was professional player and who wasn’t.
      You can give these guys in League Two full time contracts but they are still farmers, drunks, talentless players who can run for 90 minutes, nothing to learn there.

  2. How do you know that there are drunks, farmers and talentless players in League Two?

    Sheaf is injured, got injured in training, out for 10 to 14 days…

    1. OK, I lied. Players are great there and the boy will learn a lot from them. He is ball playing CB and he will fit in their tiki-taka style with no problems. If he can learn how to mark Jonh Doe in League Two he can come back to Arsenal with full experience and put Firminho in his pocket… At this age Zelalem and Toral were playing for Rangers, Ozyakup moved to Besiktas, Bendtner was very good in Championship playing for Birmingham… Do we have any player that went to League Two and came back stronger?
      I would say our loan system is absolute disaster and playing guys like Elneny and Welbeck in first team doesn’t help our youth players.
      This is the best group of young players we’ve ever had and there is a good chance that the management will destroy it with bad decisions.
      You can see in clubs like Monaco and Dortmund that playing kids instead of Elnenys have many benefits, both on field and of the field.

    2. One more thing, should I say that Spanish clubs have B team in Segunda division? That’s practically Championship. How can anyone convince me that our top talents should go 2 levels bellow that and learn something from that? Yes, he has more chances of playing but that’s just the easier way, not better way. To learn how to be competitive, give your best and take your position at stronger club should be the way we educate young players.

      1. But in England there isn’t the chance to field a B team at championship level.

        And I am telling you from experience league Two is not full of drunks and farmers. First of all play in it or coach in it, before putting it down. Yes sheaf can play, but may be the side of his game that is lacking is coming up against 14 stone 30 year olds with 10 years of experience, who just love playing the game and aren’t worried about owning a maserati

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